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Happy Birthday, Oliver Sacks!

Oliver Sacks is a British-American neurologist and best-selling author. He’s best know for his collections of neurological case histories. His books, including The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat, Musicophilia: Tales of Music and the Brain, and The Mind’s Eye.  His book Awakenings, about a group of patients who survived the encephalitis lethargica epidemic (“sleepy sickness”) of the early 20th century, inspired the 1990 Academy Award-nominate movie starring Robert De Niro and Robin Williams. The New York Times has referred to him as “the poet laureate of medicine.” He is currently a Professor of Neurology at NYU’s School of Medicine.

Learn more with Oliver Sacks with one of his many books in our collection, his YouTube videos, and even with his newsletter.

Physics Girl, Dianna Cowern, explains color with humor and some delicious looking ice cream in this video that won her the 2014 Flame Challenge put on by actor Alan Alda and the Center for Communicating Science. 

She started her YouTube channel, Physics Girl, two years ago in a personal outreach effort to get more girls interested in science and she is certainly qualified for the task. She graduated from MIT with a degree in physics where she participated in a research project on dark matter. After graduation she decided to, you know, kill some time researching low-metallicity stars at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. She then went on to work as a software engineer at General Electric in Foxboro, Mass, before moving to San Diego to work with Adam Burgasser, one of her former professors at MIT. 

Read more about her, her YouTube channel, and her other professional projects in this article from the UC San Diego news center. 

Reblogged from fishingboatproceeds  6,616 notes
fishingboatproceeds:

Walter Dean Myers died yesterday at the age of 76.
I suspect that every YA writer has a Walter Dean Myers story, but here’s mine: In 2006 or 2007, I spent a long plane ride in the cramped back row of an airplane, situated between my editor, Julie Strauss-Gabel, and Walter Dean Myers.
He hadn’t read my books and didn’t know me, but when I finally got up the nerve to introduce myself a couple hours into the flight, he was astonishingly gracious. He shared advice about writing and publishing and stories over the decades. In my many interactions with him since, he was always so kind and gracious to me. He invented so much of contemporary YA lit, but he was always quick to credit and congratulate others.
He will be remembered not just for his brilliant books (he wrote more than 100 of them!) but for his tireless advocacy: He was the National Ambassador for Children’s Literacy until just a few months ago, and in March wrote this brilliant essay about the lack of diversity in children’s books.
Like many young people of my generation, I read Myers’ war novel Fallen Angels in my adolescence—it was, in fact, probably the first YA novel I read (although at the time I didn’t know about book categories; I just thought it was good). A veteran who enlisted in the army at 17, Myers was a brilliant war novelist (Sunrise over Fallujah is also excellent), but he could write about anything: He won the first-ever Printz Award for the brilliant and deeply troubling Monster, about a murder trial, and he won the Coretta Scott King Award an astonishing six times.
It’s hard to imagine YA literature without him.

fishingboatproceeds:

Walter Dean Myers died yesterday at the age of 76.

I suspect that every YA writer has a Walter Dean Myers story, but here’s mine: In 2006 or 2007, I spent a long plane ride in the cramped back row of an airplane, situated between my editor, Julie Strauss-Gabel, and Walter Dean Myers.

He hadn’t read my books and didn’t know me, but when I finally got up the nerve to introduce myself a couple hours into the flight, he was astonishingly gracious. He shared advice about writing and publishing and stories over the decades. In my many interactions with him since, he was always so kind and gracious to me. He invented so much of contemporary YA lit, but he was always quick to credit and congratulate others.

He will be remembered not just for his brilliant books (he wrote more than 100 of them!) but for his tireless advocacy: He was the National Ambassador for Children’s Literacy until just a few months ago, and in March wrote this brilliant essay about the lack of diversity in children’s books.

Like many young people of my generation, I read Myers’ war novel Fallen Angels in my adolescence—it was, in fact, probably the first YA novel I read (although at the time I didn’t know about book categories; I just thought it was good). A veteran who enlisted in the army at 17, Myers was a brilliant war novelist (Sunrise over Fallujah is also excellent), but he could write about anything: He won the first-ever Printz Award for the brilliant and deeply troubling Monster, about a murder trial, and he won the Coretta Scott King Award an astonishing six times.

It’s hard to imagine YA literature without him.